Small Business Marketing Strategy & Process Development

Search results for process

Process Mapping for Smaller Small Businesses

on March 10 in #30DaysofQ2, Process | 0 comments

Processes are in place whether you design them or not. When you’re a smaller small–a solopreneur, solo service provider, or microbusiness–making time for process development can seem a luxury. A nice to have. And even sometimes “a waste of time” compared to the pressing needs (read: Quadrant 1) of sales efforts. This is as much a challenge for me as it is anyone. Even though I can help others by mapping their “as is” and “to be” processes and closing the gaps, doing that for myself from a time and perspective standpoint is challenging. When you’re a one-person show, it’s about efficiency, of course. But it’s easy to shrug off process, thinking, “It’s just me. What’s the impact?” And there’s no one to be accountable to anyway. No one is clamoring for this. That’s why process mapping (preceded by process identification) is a Quadrant 2 activity. If you’re struggling to see the “Important” side of this activity, put it in the context of sales. Are there any sales pain points (for you or the prospects in terms of engaging with you) that can be tracked back to process?  Are you using a CRM or automation tool that you’ve shoehorned yourself into? If so, that can be a big time waster–having to adapt to a tool. As smaller small businesses who see the need for process, we don’t need CBPPs to come in. We don’t have budget for that anyway. But we can benefit from spending time mapping key processes, even if the output isn’t on par with a Business Process Management professional’s. Processes are in place whether you design them or not. Click To Tweet Thanks for reading Day 11 of #30DaysofQ2. Please provide your feedback in the comments. 🙂   Related articles across the web The Entrepreneur’s Toolkit: 41 Tools to Get Up and...

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Business Process and Operational Efficiency

on December 9 in | 0 comments

Who Needs Business Process and Operational Efficiency? Entrepreneurs, microbusinesses, and small businesses (primarily) invest in people and task-based projects to perform their essential functions, usually creating departments or teams to achieve certain objectives. When departments or personnel have different needs and constraints, the organization’s efficiency may suffer. We consult with C-suite, VP-level management, Boards and Committees to develop overarching processes that consider all stakeholders and realign the company focus on the customer. Lack of business rules and standard processes in marketing, customer service, and sales cost small businesses and small business owners time, money, customers, and personal satisfaction. Typical symptoms owners and managers experience personally include: Feeling there are not enough hours in the day The sense that s/he must do everything themselves Sacrificing valuable personal time and their freedom The expectation that they should be able to handle this   Symptoms of lack of business processes also appear as losses of: Time & time-to-market (i.e., competitiveness) Quality Customers Employees Productivity Money Seeking outside perspective and professional process development allows company leadership to better manage business and allow others to manage non-essential functions. In the (apparent) absence of (business) rules, there are still (business) rules (that are running your business in YOUR stead)! Process development can fix that. Process Improvement: Why and How Marketing efficiency in an organization can be subject to variances over time due to staffing and leadership changes, multiple contractors, technology transitions, and acquisitions/mergers. In critical marketing and sales support areas, refining and improving the governing processes can restore order, allow for cost savings, and ensure future continuity. As an entrepreneur or a small business, process improvement typically consists of a “process audit,”whereby current systems and procedures can be mapped out and prioritized based on impact to the company. Equipped with this information, as a manager or business owner, you’ll be able to clearly see what can be delegated, automated, outsourced, postponed, skipped, or even forgotten—freeing up your time to do what only you can and making the organization more productive. To discuss further or schedule your process audit, call 602-739-8028 or email. Or, to learn more about why process is important, view...

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Why Process?

on July 21 in Process, Small Business | 0 comments

Just a quick post announcing there’s a short presentation* available now for any small or micro business owners/executives asking: Why should my company be concerned with process? How should we develop processes for our business? Process Development For Small Business 040610 Tda View more presentations from Tracy Diziere &...

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Privacy Policy for TDA

on November 28 in |

Privacy Policy Last updated: November 28, 2016 Tracy Diziere & Associates LLC (“us”, “we”, or “our”) operates the www.tracydiziere.com website (the “Service”). This page informs you of our policies regarding the collection, use and disclosure of Personal Information when you use our Service. We will not use or share your information with anyone except as described in this Privacy Policy. We use your Personal Information for providing and improving the Service. By using the Service, you agree to the collection and use of information in accordance with this policy. Unless otherwise defined in this Privacy Policy, terms used in this Privacy Policy have the same meanings as in our Terms and Conditions, accessible at www.tracydiziere.com Information Collection And Use While using our Service, we may ask you to provide us with certain personally identifiable information that can be used to contact or identify you. Personally identifiable information may include, but is not limited to, your email address, name, other information (“Personal Information”). We collect this information for the purpose of providing the Service, identifying and communicating with you, responding to your requests/inquiries, servicing your purchase orders, and improving our services. Log Data We may also collect information that your browser sends whenever you visit our Service (“Log Data”). This Log Data may include information such as your computer’s Internet Protocol (“IP”) address, browser type, browser version, the pages of our Service that you visit, the time and date of your visit, the time spent on those pages and other statistics. In addition, we may use third party services such as Google Analytics that collect, monitor and analyze this type of information in order to increase our Service’s functionality. These third party service providers have their own privacy policies addressing how they use such information. Cookies Cookies are files with a small amount of data, which may include an anonymous unique identifier. Cookies are sent to your browser from a web site and transferred to your device. We use cookies to collect information in order to improve our services for you. You can instruct your browser to refuse all cookies or to indicate when a cookie is being sent. The Help feature on most browsers provide information on how to...

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How Are You Responding to Uncertainty

on September 23 in Strengths | 0 comments

Not Much Is for Certain. How Are You Responding to Uncertainty? Spoiler alert: I don’t have it all figured out but I do have one tool you can use related to strengths which I’ll address at the end. There seems to be a lot of buzz and advice around being comfortable with–accepting?– instead of responding to uncertainty. For example, here are 3 sources I found: Being Comfortable with Uncertainty by Tony Fahkry The Benefits Of Being Comfortable With Uncertainty  by Art Markman Why You Need To Get Comfortable With Discomfort and Uncertainty by Gary Korisko While the “problem” might be clear, as well as the case for the “solution,” I’m not sure the HOW is really addressed. To be comfortable can be a stretch if you’re nail-biting and on edge–like going from 0 to 100 mph. Can we instead strive for responding well to uncertainty? That’s my approach for this post, and for life. The Problem of Uncertainty The pull and expectation to know the way forward is strong for some of us here in America. We are, after all, an outcome-driven culture. We not only want to know what to expect in the end but we also want to be able to foresee every step of the way there. (And perhaps this is not unique to America, but is a predominately Western mindset?) The question is, “How is this obsession with KNOWING affecting our daily lives, our happiness, our experience of the present, and our relationships with ourselves and others?” And if the answer comes back that’s not where we want to be, then what changes can we make? While I agree that “being comfortable with uncertainty” is an ideal space, I’m not sure Western philosophy really tells us how to get there. Or what to do.  Maybe responding to it is perhaps the best we can do at times. It’s one thing to say “Be comfortable,” but without the steps outlined, there is no making it a reality. Also, the steps might be highly individualized. Some of the advice from the sources might be helpful, but quite general: “surrender to the natural order of events by leaning in to our fears and insecurities.” (Fahkry) “reason with your anxieties by perceiving them with a logical...

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